Keys to Long-Term Weight Loss Maintenance
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7 Keys to Long-term Weight-loss Maintenance                                       

Many people struggle to maintain weight loss long-term. While fad-diets and four-week bikini-body boot camps might help you drop pounds, keeping weight off is challenging. Research shows that 95% of dieters regain lost weight within one to five years, with up to two-thirds of dieters gaining more weight than they lost dieting (Mann, et al., 2007).

Fortunately, researchers have uncovered some of the traits and strategies that can help increase your chances of successfully maintaining a healthy weight. The National Weight Control Registry (NWCR) has tracked more than 10,000 people over the last 23 years who’ve been successful in maintaining long-term weight loss. These “successful losers” share some common characteristics that have helped them keep weight off over time. These and other long-term strategies discussed below can help you achieve and maintain a healthy weight.

Ditch Diets for Lifestyle Change

Diets don’t work and can even be harmful in long-term weight loss maintenance (Mann, et al., 2007). For sustainable weight loss, focus on healthier alternatives and lifestyle changes. Diets often represent a black-and-white, all-or-nothing approach. Lifestyle changes are more broad, generalizable and adaptable to your situations and needs. Some examples of long-term lifestyle change you might adopt include eating vegetables with every meal and snack, or pairing carbohydrates with protein or fat to manage blood sugar levels. You can also integrate mindful eating as a sustainable strategy to keep weight regain at bay. While these may not seem extreme enough to promote dramatic weight loss, the power lies in their sustainability over time.

Move it or Gain it

The NWCR reports that 90% of successful losers exercise an average of one hour a day. Similarly, the American College of Sports Medicine suggests a minimum of 250 minutes of moderate-intensity activity (50 minutes, five days a week) to maintain weight loss. These guidelines may seem daunting, but activity doesn’t need to be strenuous or extreme to yield weight-related benefits. The most commonly reported form of exercise in the NWCR is walking. Walking and other moderate-intensity activities can help you maintain a healthy weight and produce many other health-improving outcomes. 

Build Up Your Strength

Strength training helps build and preserve muscle mass, which is typically lost with age and calorically restricted diets. Muscle is expensive tissue—it costs the body a lot of calories to maintain. Thus, the more muscle you have, the more calories you’ll burn through the day, even while at rest.  

Focus on working all major muscle groups two or more days a week. If you're unsure where to begin, seek out a qualified personal trainer to help you build a strength-training regimen that can be performed in the gym, outdoors or at home.

Self-monitor

You can’t change a behavior unless you know what, when and why it’s happening. Monitoring your eating and exercise behaviors helps raise your awareness around the antecedents (what causes a behavior) and consequences (thoughts, feelings, rewards or drawbacks) of engaging in a particular behavior. Food or activity logs can be useful tools for self-monitoring. A sample food log might include the following:

  • What you ate
  • How much you ate
  • Where you were
  • What you were thinking or feeling before you ate
  • How much time it took you to eat
  • What you were doing while you ate (e.g., watching television, answering emails)
  • What you were thinking or feeling after you ate (physically and emotionally)
  • Level of fullness or satiation after eating

Self-monitoring can be used regularly to keep track of eating and exercise, or it can be a strategy employed when maintaining your healthy behaviors becomes challenging.  

Seek Support

Social support is critical for long-term behavior change. With supportive friends and family, healthy eating and exercise become fun group activities that foster adherence and enjoyment. If your inner circle finds carrots distasteful and exercise a bore, maintaining your healthy habits will be more challenging. Find a group of health-minded individuals (in person or online) with whom you can identify problems, brainstorm solutions, and offer and receive support. Long-term guidance from a health and fitness professional also improves weight-related outcomes. Maintaining contact with a qualified health coach can help you plan and prepare for success and overcome obstacles that may arise.

Don’t let Lapses become Relapses

Setbacks are normal. Planning for them can help you overcome setbacks when they occur. Consider possible barriers that may hinder your ability to be active or eat well (e.g., busy schedule, stress, financial issues) and brainstorm solutions to these barriers in advance. Rather than berating yourself for “falling off the wagon,” view setbacks as opportunities for learning and growth. “Ugh, I ate so much ice cream last night. I knew I couldn’t do this!” instead becomes, “I wonder why I ate so much ice cream last night? Was I bored? Lonely? Stressed? Did I get enough to eat during the day?” With this, nothing is a failure and every “setback” is an opportunity to learn more about yourself and your needs.

Remember your Why

Weight loss is never truly about weight—it’s about reducing some physical or emotional discomfort you feel. Once you’ve lost weight and feel better, it’s easy to fall back into old habits. Whether it’s being able to play with your grandkids, reduce your risk for heart disease, or feel more comfortable and confident in a swimsuit, figure out the “why” behind your weight loss and write it down. Place this note in plain view where you’ll see it frequently. This constant reminder can help you stick with healthy behaviors when the going gets tough.

A Recipe for Success

There’s no magic pill when it comes to weight-loss maintenance; rather, multiple lifestyle factors work together to preserve your weight and health. Focusing on sustainable eating changes, regular activity, social support and self-compassion in the face of setbacks is your best bet for achieving

Jim Bohs
5 Easy Healthy Habits
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Add 5 habits

Pave the way for weight loss by incorporating these five healthy habits into your daily lifestyle.

Challenge yourself to add the following five habits to your routine every day.

1.    Eat a healthy breakfast — but not too much.
Eating breakfast can help you lose weight and keep you from overeating later in the day. You don't need to eat a lot — just something to get you off to a good start. Try whole-grain cereal — hot or cold — or toast, low-fat or skim milk, or an egg. Other good options include fat-free or low-fat yogurt, nuts, seeds, or nut butters. If you're not in the habit of eating breakfast, start by grabbing a piece of fruit and gradually add other foods.

2.    Eat vegetables and fruits.
Eat at least four servings of vegetables and three servings of fruits every day. Fresh vegetables and fruits are the foundation of a healthy diet and successful weight loss. You can eat generous portions while consuming fewer calories. Have as many veggies and fruits as you want — they also make great snacks.

3.    Eat whole grains.
Choose brown rice, barley, whole-grain breads, cereals or pastas, and other whole-grain products instead of white, refined and highly processed grain products. Whole grains are packed with vitamins, minerals and fiber and fill you up. Check food labels for the term "whole." This tells you the product isn't highly processed.

4.    Eat healthy fats.
Choose olive or vegetable oils, avocado, nuts, nut butters and the oils that come from nuts. These fats, called monounsaturated and polyunsaturated, are the most heart healthy. Look for products with little or no saturated fat and avoid trans fats altogether. All fats are high calorie, so even the healthy ones should be used sparingly. Just use a drizzle on a salad or when cooking.

5.    Move!
Walk or exercise for 30 minutes or more every day. The more physically active you are, the more calories you burn. Physical activity and exercise also offer countless other health benefits. If you haven't been physically active, start slowly and give your body a chance to get used to increased activity.

© 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. All rights reserved.

 

Jim Bohs
Why Should I Strength Train?
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5 reasons to strength-train

Define your weight-loss goals and reap the benefits of strength training. Getting started is easy.

In case you haven’t noticed yet — muscle mass naturally diminishes with age. If you don't do anything to replace the muscle you lose, you'll increase fat. But regular strength training can help you preserve and enhance your muscle mass — at any age. As part of your weight-loss plan, building lean muscle mass will help you control your body fat: As you increase lean muscle mass, your body burns calories more efficiently.

Strength training also helps you:

1.    Develop strong bones, reducing your risk of osteoporosis

2.    Reduce your risk of injury — building muscle protects your joints from injury

3.    Boost your stamina — as you grow stronger, you won't fatigue as easily

4.    Improve your body image

5.    Get a better night's sleep

 

Consider the options
Most fitness centers offer various resistance machines, weights and other tools for strength training. But hand-held weights can also work well. In addition, resistance bands — elastic-like tubes or bands available in different tensions — are inexpensive. Of course, your own body weight counts, too. Try pushups, pullups, abdominal crunches and leg squats.

Start slowly and work your way up
When you begin strength training, start slowly. Warm up with five to 10 minutes of stretching or gentle cardio activity, such as brisk walking. Then grab a light weight that you can lift at least 12 to 15 times, using smooth, controlled motions. Eventually, train with a weight that tires your muscles — so it's difficult to finish the motion by the 12th repetition. (The number of repetitions refers to the number of times you do a specific exercise. One set means completing a specific number of repetitions.) If you use the proper weight or amount of resistance, you can build muscle just as efficiently with a single set of 12 repetitions as you can with more sets of the same exercise. When you can easily do 12 or more repetitions of a specific exercise, increase the weight or resistance by up to 10 percent.

To give your muscles time to recover, rest one full day between exercising each specific muscle group. But stop if you feel pain. Although mild muscle soreness is normal, sharp pain and sore or swollen joints are signs that you've overdone it. Two to three strength-training sessions a week for 20 to 30 minutes are enough for most people.

© 2017 Mayo Foundation

Jim Bohs
Pineapple Upside Down Muffins
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Pineapple Upside-Down Muffins

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Glistening like sticky buns, these unusual muffins are packed with wholesome ingredients--vegetables, fruit and whole grains--so you can feel good about serving them to your family. If you prefer to make simple carrot muffins for lunchboxes or breakfasts-on-the-go, omit the topping; sprinkle 2 tablespoons chopped nuts over the muffins before baking, if desired.

SERVINGS: 12   Total Time: 50 min  
Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoon sugar, brown, light brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoon nuts, walnuts, chopped or pecans (optional)
  • 10 ounce(s) pineapple ring(s)
  • 3/4 cup(s) flour, whole-wheat
  • 3/4 cup(s) flour, all-purpose
  • 2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon cinnamon, ground
  • 2 large egg(s)
  • 1/2 cup(s) sugar, brown, light packed
  • 1/4 cup(s) oil, canola
  • 2 tablespoon pineapple juice, unsweetened or orange juice
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 8 ounce(s) pineapple, crushed (not drained)
  • 1 cup(s) carrot(s), shredded (about 1 large carrot)
  • 1/2 cup(s) oats, old-fashioned
  • 3/4 cup(s) raisins
  • 1/4 cup(s) nuts, walnuts, chopped

Instructions

1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Coat 12 muffin cups with cooking spray.

To prepare topping:

1. Sprinkle 1/2 teaspoon brown sugar into each muffin cup.

2. Sprinkle nuts, if using, over the sugar.

3. Stack pineapple slices and cut into 6 wedges.

4. Place 2 wedges in each muffin cup.

 

To prepare muffins:

1. Whisk whole-wheat flour, all-purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon in a large bowl.

2. Whisk eggs and brown sugar in a medium bowl until smooth.

3. Whisk in oil, juice and vanilla.

4. Stir in crushed pineapple.

5. Make a well in the dry ingredients; add the wet ingredients and stir with a rubber spatula until just combined.

6. Stir in carrot, oats, raisins and nuts, if using. Scoop the batter into the prepared muffin cups (they'll be quite full).

7. Bake the muffins until the tops are golden brown and firm to the touch, 15 to 25 minutes.

8. Immediately loosen edges and turn muffins out onto a baking sheet. Restore any stray pineapple pieces and nuts.

9. Let cool for at least 10 minutes. Serve upside-down, either warm or at room temperature.

Nutrition Details per serving   218 calories; 6 g fat (1 g sat); 3 g fiber; 39 g carbohydrates; 4 g protein; 10 mcg folate; 31 mg cholesterol; 15 g sugars; 1

Jim Bohs
Beef Stew

New American Beef Stew

From The New American Plate Cookbook: Recipes for a Healthy Weight and a Healthy Life

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One-pot meals are the original convenience food. They’re easy, versatile and can pack plenty of healthy ingredients. This stew features kale, green beans, carrots and, yes, even beef. That’s because even traditional, comforting favorites like beef stew can fit into a healthy lifestyle with a few modifications and proper portion control. Just remember to limit beef and other red meat to no more than 18 cooked ounces per week for lower cancer risk.

Photo credit: New American Plate Cookbook

Ingredients:

  • 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 lb. lean beef stew meat, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 2 large onions, chopped
  • 4 medium carrots, cubed
  • 2 cups diced leeks, rinsed well
  • 6 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 cans (14.5 ounces each) diced tomatoes in juice
  • 2 cans (6 ounces each) tomato paste
  • 2 cans (14.5 ounces each) fat-free, reduced sodium beef broth
  • 3 Tbsp. dried oregano
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 large potatoes, cubed
  • 1 1/4 lbs. frozen green beans
  • 2 cups chopped kale
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Makes 6 servings.

Per Serving: 400 calories, 10 g fat (2 g. saturated fat), 58 g carbohydrate, 26 g protein, 12 g dietary fiber, 606 mg sodium.

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook time: 2 hours


Directions

  1. In a large pot or stockpot, heat olive oil over medium-high heat.
  2. Add 1/2 of beef and sauté for about 5 minutes, stirring, until browned on all sides. Remove beef from pot and set aside. Repeat procedure with remaining beef.
  3. In the same pot, sauté onions for about 5 minutes, stirring often until translucent. Remove onions from pot and set aside.
  4. Add carrots, leeks, and garlic, and sauté for about 5 minutes, stirring often, until barely tender. Return beef and onions to pot. Add tomatoes with juice, tomato paste, broth, oregano, and water, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for about 1 hour, until beef is almost tender.
  5. Add potatoes and bring back to a boil. Lower heat, cover partially, and simmer for about 15 minutes, until potatoes are barely tender.
  6. Add green beans and kale and cook for another 6 to 8 minutes, until kale is tender.
  7. Season to taste with salt and pepper and serve.

 

Jim Bohs

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Mediterranean Chicken and Bulgur Skillet

 

Julia Levy March 03, 2017

Active time 25 mins

Total time 45 mins

Yield

Serves 4 (serving size: 3/4 cup bulgur mixture and 1 chicken breast)

Ingredients

·       4 (6-oz.) skinless, boneless chicken breasts

·       3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided

·       1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided

·       1 tablespoon olive oil, divided

·       1 cup thinly sliced red onion

·       1 tablespoon thinly sliced garlic

·       1/2 cup uncooked bulgur

·       2 teaspoons chopped fresh or 1/2 tsp. dried oregano

·       4 cups chopped fresh kale (about 2 1/2 oz.)

·       1/2 cup thinly sliced bottled roasted red bell peppers

·       1 cup unsalted chicken stock

·       2 ounces feta cheese, crumbled (about 1/2 cup)

·       1 tablespoon coarsely chopped fresh dill

How to Make It

1.     Preheat oven to 400°F.

2.     Sprinkle chicken with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper. Heat 1 1/2 teaspoons oil in a 10-inch cast-iron or other ovenproof skillet over medium-high. Add chicken to pan; cook until browned on both sides, about 3 minutes per side. Transfer chicken to a plate.

3.     Add remaining oil to pan. Add onion and garlic; cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add bulgur and oregano; cook, stirring often, until fragrant and toasted, about 2 minutes. Add kale and bell peppers; cook, stirring constantly, until kale begins to wilt, about 2 minutes. Add stock and remaining 1/4 teaspoon each salt and black pepper; bring to a boil. Remove from heat.

4.     Nestle chicken into bulgur mixture; place skillet in oven. Bake at 400°F until a meat thermometer inserted in thickest portion of chicken registers 165°F, 12 to 15 minutes. Remove from oven. Sprinkle with feta. Let stand 5 minutes. Sprinkle with dill, and serve immediately.

Nutrition Information

·       calories 369

·       fat 11.3 g

·       satfat 3.6 g

·       monofat 4.3 g

·       polyfat 1.3 g

·       protein 45 g

·       carbohydrate 21 g

·       fiber 4 g

  • cholesterol 137 mg
  • iron 2 mg
  • sodium 663 mg
  • calcium 141 mg
  • sugars 3 g
  • Est. Added Sugars 0 g

 

 

Jim Bohs
The Greatest Way To Boost Energy
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4 ways to boost your energy naturally with breakfast

Healthful protein, slowly digested carbohydrates, fruit or vegetables serve up best morning mix



As you sleep, your body is hard at work digesting yesterday's dinner. By the time you wake up, your body and brain are demanding fresh fuel. "Breaking the fast" is a key way to power up in the morning. Do it right and the benefits can last all day.

If you miss the day's first meal, notes Dr. David S. Ludwig, a nutrition expert at Harvard-affiliated Children's Hospital Boston, you may start off with an energy deficit and have to tap into your energy reserves.

What's a good breakfast? One that delivers some healthful protein, some slowly digested carbohydrates, and some fruit or vegetables. A vegetable omelet with a slice of whole-grain toast qualifies, as does a bowl of high-fiber cereal topped with fresh fruit and reduced-fat or soy milk, along with a handful of almonds or walnuts.

Try these 4 tips for creating your own energy-boosting breakfast:

1.    Choose whole grains. High-fiber, whole-grain cereals and breads can help keep your blood sugar on an even keel and avoid a midmorning energy crash. With the hundreds of types of cereal on the market, bran cereal, bran flakes, and steel-cut oatmeal are typically the healthiest bets. To choose the healthiest breakfast cereal, read the label and look for:

·      5 grams or more of fiber per serving

·      less than 300 milligrams of sodium per serving

·      less than 5 grams of sugar per serving

·      whole grain as the first item on the ingredient list

2.    Include protein. Yogurt is a good choice; Greek yogurt has more protein than regular yogurt. Eggs (up to one a day) are okay for healthy people. Although yolks are high in cholesterol, eggs have proteins, vitamins, and other nutrients and don't appear to increase the risk for developing heart disease. You might also include foods that have healthful fats such as those in nuts or salmon. Limit processed meats to the occasional treat as these foods are associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer, heart disease, and type 2 diabetes.

3.    Eat in, not out. You can enjoy a healthful breakfast out if you stick to oatmeal. But much of the traditional fare will start your day with loads of refined carbohydrates and saturated fat. Like most processed food, the breakfast offerings from fast-food chains tend to be high-sodium, low-fiber disasters.

4.    Blend up a breakfast smoothie. Combine fruit, juice, yogurt, wheat germ, tofu, and other ingredients. Toss them in your blender with a bit of ice and you have a refreshing, high energy breakfast.

Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School.

Updated: October 28, 2016

 

Jim Bohs
Baked Parmesan Zucchini Rounds
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Baked Parmesan Zucchini Rounds

Yield: 2 to 4 servings

A simple summer side dish of Baked Parmesan Zucchini Rounds comes together quickly using only two ingredients...and will disappear from the table even faster!

Ingredients

  • 2 medium-sized zucchini
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • Garlic salt & freshly ground black pepper, optional

Instructions

  1. Place oven rack in center position of oven. Preheat to 425°F. Line a baking sheet with foil (lightly misted with cooking spray) OR parchment paper.
  2. Wash and dry zucchini, and cut into 1/4-inch thick slices. Arrange zucchini rounds on prepared pan, with little to no space between them. If desired, lightly sprinkle zucchini with garlic salt and freshly ground black pepper. Use a small spoon to spread a thin layer of Parmesan cheese on each slice of zucchini. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until Parmesan turns a light golden brown. (Watch these closely the first time you make them and pull them out of the oven early if the Parmesan is golden before 15 minutes!) Serve immediately.

Recipe Management Powered by Zip Recipes Plugin

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http://www.fivehearthome.com/2014/06/21/baked-parmesan-zucchini-rounds/

Jim Bohs
Mind Full
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Mindful Eating: Are You Aware?

Posted on July 21, 2017 by U Rock Girls

Ask yourself the following – Are you a mindful eater? Do you stop when it’s meal time and put away the phone, shut off the TV, and close out the email? Are you sitting at a table (versus driving in the car)? Chances are, like most busy people, you don’t. Instead, in the world of go, go, go, do more in less time, and multitasking, you eat on the run, eat while on the phone, eat while catching up on your TV shows, and eat while on the computer. Raise your hand if you’re eating while reading this post!

How Mindless Eating is Harmful

It might not seem like a big deal, but eating while doing other things can be harmful to your health. Huh (you ask while mid-bite)? First, when you eat while you drive you put yourself (and others) at an increased risk of having an auto accident. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says that 20% of injuries caused by vehicle crashes in 2009 happened because a driver was distracted. That’s not just because of eating and driving, of course. Applying makeup, looking for a CD, answering a text are other forms of distractions while driving. But eating while driving isn’t necessary – eat before or after you have to drive somewhere. You won’t starve on the drive, no matter how long it is!

The other kind of distracted eating is when we eat while watching TV or while on the computer. When your mind is fixated on a movie or the latest hit you tube video, it’s shut off from the cues that your body gives you when it’s had enough to eat. So you keep eating and eating and never notice the signal that you’re full. When the TV show, movie, or video is over, you don’t feel satisfied because you don’t remember what you ate. Chances are you’ll grab something else to eat to chase whatever it is that you’re craving. Too many calories = weight gain = increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Solution: turn off the gadgets.

Lose Weight with Mindful Eating

One of the most important things we do when we work with our clients is help them repair their relationship with food. Too often we find that most people, especially women, have a lousy relationship with food and just as dysfunctional relationship with their own bodies. One of the most important steps to repairing these relationships is with Mindful Eating. With Mindful Eating, we encourage the following:

§  Eat when you are hungry, stop when you are full

§  When you eat, just eat (no TV, computer, cell phone, etc.)

§  Honor your body

§  Eat slowly, put your fork/spoon down between bites, and notice the taste, texture, aroma, and temperature of your food. Really make it a sensory experience to get the full pleasure out of it.

Try this little exercise at your next meal. Before even taking a bite, notice what you have on your plate. Is it colorful? Are there a variety of textures? Next, think about what it took to get this food to you. Who was responsible for growing and caring for the food? Give a little thanks to them. Then take a bite. Put down your fork and chew the food completely before swallowing. What did you notice – was it sweet, salty, sour, or spicy? Then take another bite. What do you notice about the texture – smooth, lumpy, moist, or dry? Keep doing this throughout the meal until you feel the first signal that you are getting full. Remember, it takes 20 minutes for your brain to receive the signal from your stomach that it’s full. Chances are (if you’re following the above steps) it will take you at least that long to get through most of what’s on your plate. You may even have food left over. Great. Wrap it up and have it tomorrow – a meal that delicious should want to be eaten again. At the end of the meal, you should feel satisfied, not stuffed. Eating like this more often, you will take in fewer calories, making it easier to lose those unwanted pounds and keep them off for good.

 

Jim Bohs
Should I Begin Yoga?... The Hidden Benefits
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Yoga: The Hidden Health Benefits of Down Dogging

By Shilpi Agarwal, MD

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Many people hear “yoga”, and think Zen gardens, meditation, and free spirits. But you may be surprised to find that one recent study showed that those who incorporated yoga into their life had improved stress levels and lower blood pressure. Yoga was ultimately developed to combine controlled breathing and poses to achieve physical, mental, and spiritual strength and unity. In fact, Michelle Obama even attributes her sleek physique to frequent yoga sessions. There are multiple types of yoga, but Hatha Yoga is the most commonly practiced type in the United States.

Here are some surprising health benefits of practicing yoga that you may have never known!

Relief of Back Pain: More than 60 million Americans suffer from chronic back pain. Yoga is one of the best exercises to help alleviate pain. This is due to the increase in core stability (abdominal muscles) and the reduction of pressure across the lower back and surrounding muscles. Yoga also helps to release endorphins throughout the body that can calm inflammation. Practicing yoga for just two sessions a week may reduce or even eliminate back pain. Many individuals also report an increase in pain tolerance after attending sessions for only three weeks.

Heart Healthy: Further research also demonstrates that even one yoga session can produce a calming effect on the body, and individuals in one study showed reduction in their systolic blood pressure after only 12 weeks of two yoga sessions per week. Additionally, incorporating yoga into a cardiac rehabilitation program after a heart attack or bypass surgery has also shown promise in maintaining lower levels of stress and healthy blood pressure levels.

Increased Flexibility: You may be thinking, “No Duh”, on this one, but the benefits may be surprising. Practicing poses like downward dog, and tree pose can improve balance and flexibility. This can directly strengthen and protect your larger joints (knees, hips, back, neck) from injury and reduce inflammation in the smaller joints (fingers and ankles). This can also help reduce falls in the elderly, and ultimately avoid fractures in this age group.

Mood Booster: In addition to mental clarity and relaxation, yoga has been shown to improve depression, anxiety, and chronic stress. A small German study reviewed in the Harvard Mental Health Letter demonstrated that at the end of a three-month period, women perceived less stress, depression, anxiety, and fatigue. A few yoga classes could leave you happier and less stressed. Increased happiness alone is reason enough to give it a try!

As with any new exercise, always consult your physician before you begin. This is to ensure your body can safely complete the activity. I also recommend you attend a beginner class or view a video with some common poses. This will make you feel more confident during your first class and ensure you obtain the most benefit.

Jim BohsComment
Spinach Stuffed Chicken
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Spinach Stuffed Chicken #ClassicRecipes

You’ll look like a professional chef when you serve these stuffed chicken breasts for dinner.

Prep time: 20 minutes

Cook time: 10 minutes

Serves: 4

Ingredients:

  1. Olive oil cooking spray
  2. 4 skinless boneless chicken breasts
  3. 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  4. ½ cup shredded or 4 slices low sodium mozzarella cheese
  5. 1 cup fresh spinach leaves
  6. 1 medium tomato, sliced
  7. ⅛ teaspoon salt
  8. Black pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Coat 9x13-inch pan with cooking spray.
  2. Place spinach in large microwavable bowl, and heat in the microwave for one minute, so spinach is wilted.
  3. Rub chicken with garlic. Cut each chicken breast open lengthwise (like a book) and season the inside with salt and pepper.
  4. Spray large skillet with cooking spray and heat over medium-high heat until hot. Add chicken breasts and cook 4-5 minutes. Flip and cook 4-5 more minutes. Make sure there is no pink inside.
  5. Remove chicken and place on plate.
  6. Once chicken has cooled enough to handle, stuff each chicken with spinach, mozzarella, and tomato.
  7. Place stuffed chicken in pan and bake for 10 minutes.

 

Nutrition info (per serving): Calories: 391, Fat: 11g, Sodium: 158mg, Carbs: 3g, Sugars: 2g, Protein: 66g.

Jim Bohs
Balsamic Caramelized Onion Turkey Burger
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Balsamic Caramelized Onions:

·       3 large onions (any kind will do, but I usually use white or red), cut in half and then sliced

·       1/2 cup balsamic vinegar

Burgers:

·       2 lbs. ground turkey

·       1/2 cup finely chopped onion

·       2 TBS Worcestershire sauce

·       1/2 tsp salt

·       1/2 tsp fresh cracked black pepper

·       2 tsp (3 large cloves) of garlic, minced

·       1 Tbsp. dried thyme

Toppings:

·       8 slices provolone cheese

·       balsamic caramelized onions

·       whatever you want to put it on: whole wheat bun, English muffin, pita, greens, etc..

Make the balsamic caramelized onions:

1.     Put your sliced onions and vinegar in a large skillet with a tight fitting lid. If you don't have one you can use a pot instead, but the process may take a bit longer. Cover and cook over medium heat about 20 minutes.

2.     Take off the lid and continue to cook, stirring every few minutes, until there is no liquid left. Once this happens, the onions will start to caramelize. You'll then add 1/3 cup of water, stirring again until there is no liquid left. Repeat this process until onions are fully cooked and caramelized. Set aside.

To make the burgers:

1.     Mix together all ingredients, form into 8 burger patties. Preheat your grill to medium-high heat. Make sure it's nice and hot before adding your burgers or they may stick. You can also cook these in a cast iron skillet. Either way, using medium-high heat, they should take about 7 minutes on each side. Flip only once to get the juiciest burgers and cook until the burgers reach 165 degrees or if you don't have a thermometer, until they're hot and no longer pink on the inside. Put a slice of provolone on each one and close the lid until melted (this will only take a minute or so).

2.     Serve each tasty turkey burgers on whatever you like, such as a whole wheat bun, English muffin, greens, etc., along with about 1/8th of the caramelized onions.

Yield: 8 Servings (each serving is 1 burger, 1 slice of cheese and 1/8th of the balsamic onions)

Calories per serving: 223

Fat per serving: 11 grams

Jim Bohs
Americans Come Up Short: Fruits & Veggies
Americans come up short on fruits and vegetables By Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. July 14, 2015 This isn't the first time you've heard the advice to eat more fruits and vegetables. Eating fruits and vegetables provides vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants that help reduce your risk for many diseases, including heart disease, stroke and some cancers. These low-calorie yet high-nutrient foods can even help you manage your weight when consumed in place of lower nutrient, higher calorie foods. A recent report from the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention summarizes U.S. fruit and vegetable intake. Our report card isn't great. Seventy-six percent of adults didn't meet fruit intake recommendations, and 87 percent didn't meet vegetable recommendations. Among children, 60 percent didn't meet fruit intake recommendations, and 93 percent didn't meet vegetable recommendations. Half of the total U.S. population consumed less than 1 cup of fruit and less than 1 1/2 cups of vegetables daily. It's time to tune in and make some improvements to our diets. Adults who engage in at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity daily should consume 1 1/2 to 2 cups of fruits and 2 to 3 cups of vegetables daily. Here's my advice: Every time you eat, include a fruit or vegetable, or one of each. Sounds simple, and it is with a little planning. Here's how to make it happen: ·         Plan for it. Get more fruits and vegetables in the house. Get them on your plate. ·         Store smart. Put produce at eye level in the fridge or in a bowl right on the counter. ·         Pack it. Put 2 to 3 options in your lunch sack, purse, gym bag or briefcase. Don't leave home without them. ·         Eat it. Enjoy fruits and vegetables simply or look for ways to include them in entrees and side dishes. Want dessert? Put more strawberries and banana than ice cream in a bowl — still delicious! Encourage your workplace, daycare, schools and any other places you frequent to not only make plant-based foods available but to put them front and center. Let's boost the average and improve our diet grade. How will you plan, store, pack and, most importantly, eat more fruits and vegetables?  

Americans come up short on fruits and vegetables

By Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. July 14, 2015

This isn't the first time you've heard the advice to eat more fruits and vegetables. Eating fruits and vegetables provides vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants that help reduce your risk for many diseases, including heart disease, stroke and some cancers. These low-calorie yet high-nutrient foods can even help you manage your weight when consumed in place of lower nutrient, higher calorie foods.

A recent report from the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention summarizes U.S. fruit and vegetable intake. Our report card isn't great.

Seventy-six percent of adults didn't meet fruit intake recommendations, and 87 percent didn't meet vegetable recommendations. Among children, 60 percent didn't meet fruit intake recommendations, and 93 percent didn't meet vegetable recommendations. Half of the total U.S. population consumed less than 1 cup of fruit and less than 1 1/2 cups of vegetables daily.

It's time to tune in and make some improvements to our diets. Adults who engage in at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity daily should consume 1 1/2 to 2 cups of fruits and 2 to 3 cups of vegetables daily.

Here's my advice: Every time you eat, include a fruit or vegetable, or one of each. Sounds simple, and it is with a little planning. Here's how to make it happen:

·         Plan for it. Get more fruits and vegetables in the house. Get them on your plate.

·         Store smart. Put produce at eye level in the fridge or in a bowl right on the counter.

·         Pack it. Put 2 to 3 options in your lunch sack, purse, gym bag or briefcase. Don't leave home without them.

·         Eat it. Enjoy fruits and vegetables simply or look for ways to include them in entrees and side dishes. Want dessert? Put more strawberries and banana than ice cream in a bowl — still delicious!

Encourage your workplace, daycare, schools and any other places you frequent to not only make plant-based foods available but to put them front and center.

Let's boost the average and improve our diet grade. How will you plan, store, pack and, most importantly, eat more fruits and vegetables?

 

Jim BohsComment